If you’re looking to take a step forward in your construction career, it’s highly likely that you will be required to interview for the roles that you are applying to. With construction being a predominantly practical, hands-on profession - an interview environment can seem a little abstract to a large pool of candidates, with many finding the experience nerve-wracking and alienating. But to take the leap to a better or more rewarding construction position, this stage of the recruitment is both necessary and compulsory in today’s market.

Consider the following tips if you really want to perform well in your next interview.

Keep it relevant

If you read career advice blogs, then you will find that experts strongly advise that you complete research about the company that you are applying to work for, before the interview stage.

This includes company history or background, past, present, and future projects, as well as the company’s ethics. From here, you will be able to demonstrate a solid understanding about the company when asked questions in the interview.

You will certainly impress an employer if you can relate your personal experience or skills back to the company, explaining why you are such a good fit, and how you will benefit them.

Focus on the pleasantries

In an interview environment, you will need to focus on standard pleasantries in order to come across as a level-headed, experienced professional who has an understanding of the business world.

This may seem trivial to most, but if you ignore the widely recognised courtesies of an interview, then you will only damage your chances of obtaining the position.

Not only will you need to ensure that you shake the hand of your interviewer upon arrival, but you must express your gratitude to them sparing the time to speak to you, all of course, whilst you look them in the eye.

Practice body-language and it’s about ‘eye contact’

A face-to-face interview environment can be a challenging prospect for people, especially for those who consider themselves shy or introverted. It is the easiest thing in the world to apply for a job via an online application and in the comfort of your own home. But with a job interview, you are tasked with impressing someone in person, in a high pressure situation, of whom you have never met before.

But what is interesting is the large role that body language plays in your overall portrayal of your personality in an interview scenario, with researchers suggesting that 60% - 90% of our communication is nonverbal, but physical.

In order to succeed at the interview stage of the recruitment process, you will need to emanate positivity, which can be achieved through body language as well as speech. Positive body language musts include:

  • handshake on arrival
  • sitting with a straight back
  • hand gesturing to help communicate
  • leaning in when the interviewer is speaking
  • keeping eye contact

Most importantly, you must appear relaxed and composed during your interview – which the above should help you with. This also leads us to our next piece of advice.

Produce well-paced answers to questions

There’s no two-ways about it - on the day of the interview, you will be nervous, anxious, and to an extent pretty stressed - but what’s really important is that you remain composed so that you can leave a lasting impression. As well as your answers on the day, your performance will also be analysed on how well you listen to your interviewer’s questions and queries.

Don’t worry about responding to your interview’s question instantly. If you need time to think, take it – this shows that you care about your answers, and that you are fully committed to answering the questions properly.

If you have the luxury of knowing exactly what you want to say even before the interviewer has finished asking his/her question, you should still take a brief moment to pause and breath before delivering your answer. This again will reinforce the notion that you think before answering, instead of blurting out the first thing that enters your head.

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